Clause

For the longest time, I believed that a film I had seen as a kid was the result of a fever I had, or maybe a dream that was the result of entirely too many Cocoa Pebbles. My mom owned a video store in our small town and would bring home all the off the beaten path gems. The yet unsolved, Dial Code Santa Clause ended up being a film I would describe to people but they would mostly suggest that it might be Home Alone or that I had eaten too many Cocoa Pebbles while running a fever while watching Home Alone.

This year’s Fantastic Fest undid the mystery that had plagued me all these years. Their screening of Dial Code Santa Clause was the film. Finally, reunited and it felt so good.  

Turns out the film directed by René Manzor didn’t have wide distribution. In fact, only bootleg copies were being slung about here in the states.

Following the massively positive reaction from Fantastic Fest, the American Genre Film Archive opened it up for theatrical bookings with select theaters having a screening over the Christmas holidays giving folks a chance to discover this treasure. 

The film plays out like Die Hard and Home Alone had a disturbed Xmas obsessed child. It is a really special film that easily became my new favorite Christmas film.

Thomas is a typical 1980s kid: he loves computers,role-playing games, and his dog. While mom is away at the office on Christmas Eve, Thomas and his grandfather are left home alone — perfect timing for a disgruntled, perverted, bloodthirsty Santa Claus to raid the home down the chimney. But Hell hath no fury like a mulleted ten-year-old with an arsenal of toys! Made a year before HOME ALONE, the French-made DIAL CODE SANTA CLAUS has almost the same plot — only filled with more style, bloodshed, and Rambo references.

Go seek out a screening and don’t miss this uniquely bonkers Christmas gem.

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