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Another week has come and gone, and iHorror is back with another batch of free movies.  So fire up the computer, heat up the popcorn, and get an eyeful of these horrors.

Jawbreaker (1999)
Jawbreaker (1999)

Jawbreaker

Jawbreaker is about a group of girls who jokingly kidnap one of their friends on her birthday, accidentally killing her by shoving a jawbreaker down her throat in the process.  While they decide how to handle the situation, a nerdy outcast girl stumbles upon their plot, and they transform her into one of them – stylish, charming, and beautiful – to take their dead friend’s place.  More black comedy and crime thriller than outright horror movie, this 1999 teeny pop flick is a bit like Heathers for the next generation.  Jawbreaker has a cast full of familiar faces; Rose McGowan, Julie Benz, and Rebecca Gayheart are the popular girls, Judy Greer is the outcast, and Pam Grier plays a tough-as-nails detective.  Even Marilyn Manson and The Donnas make quick appearances.  If you’re in the mood for some nineties nostalgia, check out Jawbreaker here at Crackle.

Dracula (1931)
Dracula (1931)

Dracula

This is the one.  The Universal Monsters classic Dracula.  Bela Lugosi’s performance in this 1931 Tod Browning telling of Bram Stoker’s seminal vampire novel has become the bar by which all of the other bloodsucking performances since have been measured.  Even Christopher Lee, who played the Count a dozen times for Hammer, had his performances constantly compared to that of Lugosi; this movie is that legendary.  Dracula is a must-see for any self-respecting horror fan, so if you haven’t seen it, or if you just want to see it again, head over here to BnWmovies.com and sink your teeth into it.

11-11-11 (2011)
11-11-11 (2011)

11-11-11

When the dates aligned in 2011 for there to be an 11-11-11 on November 11th, of course someone was going to make a movie about it.  This is Darren Lynn Bousman’s psychological thriller about a man who, while dealing with the deaths of his wife and son, travels to Spain to be with his sick father and starts to have visions of death and demons, predicting all hell breaking loose on 11-11-11.  This film is actually much better than it sounds, but Bousman got kind of a raw deal when The Asylum came out with 11/11/11 (yes, they’re different movies).  That’s why this movie is also known as 11-11-11: The Prophecy.  Whatever you want to call it, you can see 11-11-11 right here on Hulu.

Atom Age Vampire (1960)
Atom Age Vampire (1960)

Atom Age Vampire

Atom Age Vampire isn’t really about a vampire at all.  It’s about a young dancer whose face is disfigured when she gets into a car accident.  A doctor has developed a treatment that can make her beautiful again, but he must kill other young women to perform his procedure.  This 1960 low-budget classic Italian is a slick mixture of b-movie campiness and high-brow artistry, and it’s got a much smarter script than one can usually expect from a cheesy sci-fi horror flick.  For fans of sixties schlock cinema, Atom Age Vampire is definitely worth a look, and it can be found here at DailyMotion.

Invitation to Hell (1984)
Invitation to Hell (1984)

Invitation to Hell

In light of his recent passing, it would be remiss for us to not include a Wes Craven film in this week’s offerings.  We’ve got one that (hopefully) you haven’t already seen.  Made in 1984, the same year as A Nightmare on Elm Street, Wes Craven’s Invitation to Hell is about a family that moves to a suburban community and is asked to join the local country club.  Unfortunately for them, the membership dues are higher than they are willing to pay (hint: Invitation to Hell is not just a clever name).  This one is a TV movie, and it boasts a TV movie cast, with appearances by Robert Urich, Susan Lucci, Joanna Cassidy, Joe Regalbuto, and Soleil Moon Frye (who is better known as Punky Brewster).  You can catch Invitation to Hell right here on YouTube.