Ready for some more free movies?  Good…because we’ve got them.  Here’s your weekly dose of tightwad terrors, from our computer to yours.

The Spell (1977)
The Spell (1977)

The Spell

Made back in 1977, when T.V. movies were still scary, The Spell is about a teenage girl who uses psychic powers to get even with the high school bullies who have been picking on her.  If this sounds familiar, it should; it’s basically Carrie, made a year later and toned down for prime-time television.  It’s still has its moments, as the young girls revenge tactics take the form of more The Omen-esque “accidental” incidents.  The screenplay for The Spell was written by Brian Taggert, who would go on to write further horror classics like Visiting Hours, The New Kids, and Poltergeist III.  Also, keep an eye out for a young Helen Hunt.  The Spell is available right here on Hulu.

There's Nothing Out There (1991)
There’s Nothing Out There (1991)

There’s Nothing Out There

There’s Nothing Out There is about a group of kids who head out to a cabin in the woods to have a party.  Not long after they arrive, their resident horror movie expert starts pointing out things that can only mean that they are in for a long and horrifying night.  This fun horror/comedy is from 1991, a few years before the Scream franchise made being self-referential cool and twenty years before The Cabin in the Woods blew the doors off of the kids-in-the-forest subgenre.  There’s Nothing Out There has some hilariously meta moments, a few good twists, and an awesome rubber-creature monster.  It was distributed by Troma Entertainment on home video, so that gives you a pretty good idea of what you’re in for with There’s Nothing Out There.  Check it out here on YouTube.

Murder in the Heartland: The Search for Video X (2003)
Murder in the Heartland: The Search for Video X (2003)

Murder in the Heartland: The Search for Video X

Murder in the Heartland: The Search for Video X is a found footage/faux documentary movie about a pair of teenage sweethearts who embark on a savage murder spree across the middle United States, videotaping their every act for posterity.  This 2003 movie was made in the years between The Blair Witch Project and Paranormal Activity, so it’s not quite an original idea, but it is chillingly executed.  The filmmakers really committed to the fact that the events were real (even though they weren’t) by not crediting the actors in the film and releasing an unedited “evidence” tape that is just the crime spree footage without the benefit of additional interviews and backstory for context.  Murder in the Heartland should not be confused with the 1993 television mini-series of the same name about Charles Starkweather’s real-life spree killings, even if the events of the stories are very similar.  You can see the Murder in the Heartland “documentary” here on SnagFilms, or the “unedited” Video X: Evidence tape here on Viewster.

Revolt of the Zombies (1936)
Revolt of the Zombies (1936)

Revolt of the Zombies

Taking place during World War I, Revolt of the Zombies is about a ruthless military leader who has discovered a way to turn men into zombies, and he intends to use it to build an undefeatable army.  This moody 1936 film is a sequel to the classic White Zombie, even though the former has little to do with the latter aside from the fact that it was made by the same brothers, Edward and Victor Halperin, and a shot of Bela Lugosi’s eyes is briefly purloined in one montage.  Revolt of the Zombies is a cool reminder of how Hollywood saw zombies in the pre-Romero voodoo days, and it’s still better than most of what passes for zombie movies in today’s oversaturated cinematic climate.  Watch Revolt of the Zombies right here at DailyMotion.

Mind Ripper (1995)
Mind Ripper (1995)

Mind Ripper

Mind Ripper is about a secret government program whose goal is to create a superhuman soldier but, of course, the experiments go horribly wrong and the subjects end up killing everyone involved.  A former scientist who worked on the project finds himself trapped in the compound with his family, forced to fight off one of the unstoppable creatures.  In its day, this 1995 movie was marketed as an entry in Wes Craven’s The Hills Have Eyes franchise, but it shares no common characters or situations, just Craven’s name-above-the-title as the executive producer.  Oh, and it was written by Wes Craven’s son, Jonathan.  Horror stalwart Lance Henriksen stars as the former scientist, and Giovanni Ribisi plays his son.  You can find Mind Ripper right here on Hulu.