Before there were Kindles and e-readers, paperback books dominated the Best Seller list in the 70s and 80s, Sam Raimi is getting behind one of the most popular authors of that era, James Herbert.

Herbert was part of an elite clan of literary horror minds at the time, writers such as Stephen King, Peter Straub and John Saul.

In 1983 Herbert released the supernatural thriller Shrine which only now will get a film adaptation.

Raimi, who hasn’t directed a film in five years won’t be helming this project either, he’s producing it once again for Screen Gems the studio that gave us Don’t Breathe.

Evan Spiliotopoulos is writing the screenplay and will direct the film as well as co-produce with Raimi according to Collider.  Ghost House exec Rob Tapert will give them some production assistance too.

Shrine follows Alice Pagett a child who is deaf and mute. She experiences what she thinks is a miracle near an oak tree at her church. Her healing becomes a media sensation and reporter Gerry Fenn follows up on the story as Alice cures others at the tree in a makeshift shrine.

Father Hagan, the local priest, is not convinced that a miracle took place but something far more sinister.

Although Shrine was released as a hardback too, soft covers were all the rage back then when it came to portable reading. They even have their own New York Times bestseller category, a list that in the 70s and 80s was often filled with horror titles.

Source: Collider

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