Mrs. March Elisabeth Moss

Elisabeth Moss, Blumhouse Developing ‘Mrs. March’ Adaptation

Waylon JordanMovie NewsLeave a Comment

Elisabeth Moss (The Invisible Man) and her Love and Squalor Pictures production company are teaming up with Blumhouse to adapt Virginia Feito’s novel, Mrs. March, for the big screen! Feito is set to write the screenplay.

Described as a psychological thriller, the novel centers on an Upper East Side housewife who spirals into insanity when she suspects the horrible protagonist in her husband’s new novel is based on her. The book is slated for release in the U.S. in August 2021.

“Not only is Elisabeth one of the finest actors of her generation but she’s an unabashed fan of genre material and an incredible collaborator. Lindsey and Elisabeth have impeccable taste, when they brought us Mrs. March we jumped at the chance to work with them,” Jason Blum, Blumhouse founder and CEO, said in a statement we received today.

“I read Virginia’s novel in one sitting and was so captured by it I knew I had to make it and play Mrs. March,” Moss added. “As a character, she is fascinating, complex, and deeply human and I can’t wait to sink my teeth into her. Mrs. March is exactly the kind of engaging and challenging female led project that Love And Squalor Pictures is built to make. As a company, we are thrilled to make our debut announcement in the features space as partners with Blumhouse. Having worked with Jason on US and the company on The Invisible Man, I am constantly struck by their creativity and intelligence. Jason Blum is a powerhouse force in the world of storytelling and I am personally honored to be in the Blumhouse family.”

Moss has made a name for herself digging into complex and often troubled characters on the big and small screen in projects like ShirleyThe Invisible Man, and The Handmaid’s Tale.

iHorror will be following this film as it develops and we’ll bring you the latest news as we learn it.

Waylon Jordan is a lifelong fan of genre fiction and film especially those with a supernatural element. He firmly believes that horror reflects collective fears of society and can be used as a tool for social change.