If there’s one celebrity I’d love to have a chance to just sit down and have a chat with more than anyone else, it would be Stephen King. The man has written so many iconic stories, and IT is my personal favorite book ever.

I know I’m far from alone in my King worship, and would list him alongside legends like H.P. Lovecraft, and Edgar Allan Poe, without any hesitation, although King has enough humility that he’d probably shy away from that.

King has published over 50 full-length novels and over 200 short stories, and at age 71, he shows no signs of slowing down. Earlier this week, King’s official website announced the release of his latest work, The Institute.

The Institute hits store shelves on September 10th, and runs 576 pages, which really isn’t that long on the King scale after epic-length tomes like The Stand. Below is the official synopsis, which lays out what fans need to know.

In the middle of the night, in a house on a quiet street in suburban Minneapolis, intruders silently murder Luke Ellis’s parents and load him into a black SUV. The operation takes less than two minutes. Luke will wake up at The Institute, in a room that looks just like his own, except there’s no window. And outside his door are other doors, behind which are other kids with special talents—telekinesis and telepathy—who got to this place the same way Luke did: Kalisha, Nick, George, Iris, and ten-year-old Avery Dixon. They are all in Front Half. Others, Luke learns, graduated to Back Half, “like the roach motel,” Kalisha says. “You check in, but you don’t check out.”


In this most sinister of institutions, the director, Mrs. Sigsby, and her staff are ruthlessly dedicated to extracting from these children the force of their extranormal gifts. There are no scruples here. If you go along, you get tokens for the vending machines. If you don’t, punishment is brutal. As each new victim disappears to Back Half, Luke becomes more and more desperate to get out and get help. But no one has ever escaped from the Institute.


As psychically terrifying as Firestarter, and with the spectacular kid power of It, The Institute is Stephen King’s gut-wrenchingly dramatic story of good vs. evil in a world where the good guys don’t always win.

A blend of Firestarter and IT? Shut up and take my money. Included below is the official cover art for The Institute. One wonders how long it’ll take for King’s latest novel to find its way into the hands of a movie or TV studio.