Firestarter

Keith Thomas Tapped to Direct New Adaptation of ‘Firestarter’

Waylon JordanNews1 Comment

Writer/director Keith Thomas is set to helm a proposed new adaptation of Stephen King’s classic novel Firestarter by Universal Pictures and Blumhouse. Variety reports the script will reportedly be written by Halloween Kills scribe Scott Teems.

Thomas is the third director attached to the film which has had trouble finding its feet since it was first announced almost two years ago. Both Akiva Goldsman (A Beautiful Mind) and Fatih Akin (In the Fade) have been signed on at various times to the project. Goldsman is still attached to the project as a producer through Weed Roads Productions.

Firestarter tells the story of a young girl named Charlie McGee who was born with extraordinary pyrokinetic abilities, able to start and control fire with the power of her mind alone. Charlie and her father, who has the ability to control other people’s minds to a degree, are on the run from an off-the-books government agency known as the Shop and soon find themselves captured to disastrous results.

The novel was previously adapted back in 1984 with a young Drew Barrymore–who will also reportedly serve as a producer on the new film–in the role of Charlie alongside David Keith as her father and George C. Scott in the role of John Rainbird, a mercenary who deceives Charlie in an attempt to win her trust so that he can kill her.

While King adaptations are all the rage at the moment, it’s safe to say that the ’84 film was not the best adaptation of the author’s work–King himself noted that it was a rather bland film that did not quite do the novel justice–and it will be interesting to see how Firestarter comes to life in this new iteration.

Time will tell. Stay tuned to iHorror for more updates on this project as information becomes available.

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Waylon Jordan is a lifelong fan of genre fiction and film especially those with a supernatural element. He firmly believes that horror reflects collective fears of society and can be used as a tool for social change.