Our Lady of the Inferno Fangoria

Fangoria has been a genre media giant for decades. They’ve recently made their triumphant return to print journalism and have been producing and distributing films and TV series since the 1990s. Their newest project is a bit more personal to the Fangoria franchise; Preston Fassel’s Our Lady of the Inferno — the first officially licensed novel published under the Fangoria Presents imprint, and penned by one of their staff writers — is set to receive a book-to-screen adaptation.

Set against the backdrop of 1980s New York, Our Lady of the Inferno tells the intersecting stories of two deadly women: Ginny Kurva, a 21-year-old polymath who works as a madam to a stable of working girls, and Nicolette Aster, a city safety inspector who moonlights as a serial killer, kidnapping women at night to hunt and murder them in a labyrinth she created in the Staten Island landfill.

The novel sold out on Amazon on the day of its release and has been followed by a wave of positive reviews, particularly regarding the book’s treatment of its female characters and strong female villain.

Laura Moss and Brendan J. O’Brien will write the screenplay in collaboration with Fassel, who will serve as executive producer alongside Phil Nobile Jr, Fangoria’s Editor-in-Chief. Dallas Sonnier (Bone Tomahawk, Brawl In Cell Block 99) and Amanda Presmyk (Puppet Master: The Littlest Reich, The Standoff at Sparrow Creek) will produce.

Fangoria Presents cover art by Ashley Detmering

Preston Fassel spoke with iHorror about the motivation and inspiration for Our Lady of the Inferno and how important it was to him to have female collaboration for the film.

“During my years writing about women in the horror genre, something I heard time and again from filmmakers and actresses was that they needed more and better roles,” Fassel said. “I wanted to create something that would bring the horror world really iconic female characters and villains, and create more work for women in the horror genre. Because 95% of the characters are women, I was always adamant that I’d want female collaborator on the script.”

Fassel also shared his confidence in the writing team and his goals for the production:

“Very beautifully I came to know Laura and Brian. I think they’re just the perfect team because one of the themes of the book is a possibility for a reconciliation between the sexes. And I’d like for this to be directed by a woman. So I hope that I’ve created something that people love, and something that has some kind of positive impact on the horror community.”

 

For more horror novel adaptations, click here to read our announcement of the upcoming adaptation of Grady Hendrix’s My Best Friend’s Exorcism.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here