Ennio Morricone

Famed Film Composer Ennio Morricone has Died at 91

Waylon JordanRest In PeaceLeave a Comment

Film composer extraordinaire, Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91 after complications from a fall last week in Rome.

To say that he was a giant in the world of film music would be an understatement. At the time of his death, Morricone had more than 500 film and television scores to his credit spanning nearly every genre imaginable.

He was born in Rome in 1928, and would later meet Sergio Leone when they were both attending classes. The meeting would eventually spark one of the most notable composer/director relationships in film history when Leone asked Morricone to score his “spaghetti western,” A Fistful of Dollars. The film was Clint Eastwood’s first real starring role, and the work of all three created something unlike anything film audiences had seen.

Morricone’s score for that film would go on to influence countless other composers, and set him on the path to becoming one of the most sought after talents of his generation.

Unlike many film composers, he never shied away from genre work, often composing for science fiction and thrillers. He worked with horror maestro Dario Argento on several occasions including The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, The Cat O’ Nine Tails, and 1998’s The Phantom of the Opera, and composed music for John Carpenter’s classic The Thing.

Though he was nominated for an Oscar six times, he did not win until his work on Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight, nine years after he received an Honorary Oscar for his extensive work in film.

Morricone is survived by his wife of more than 60 years, Maria, and their four children. iHorror extends our condolences to all of Ennio Morricone’s family and friends.

Give a listen to some of his work from The Hateful Eight and watch the composer conducting in the video below.

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Waylon Jordan is a lifelong fan of genre fiction and film especially those with a supernatural element. He firmly believes that horror reflects collective fears of society and can be used as a tool for social change.