Best Movies on Shudder

5 Best Movies on Shudder You Probably Haven’t Seen

Curt FiersBest Of List, Streaming VideosLeave a Comment

Once you start looking for the best movies on Shudder, you essentially fall down a rabbit hole. There are hundreds of options hailing from every subgenre, and some of the most classic selections go all the way back to the 1930s (i.e. The Old Dark House). Unfortunately, we far too often get caught up in watching whatever films currently have the most hype.

I don’t like it any more than you do, but this means we miss out on awesome films that simply didn’t get the love they deserved. If you make a habit of watching movies you’ve never heard of on Shudder, you might have caught a few of these. If not, you’re in for a treat.

1. Darling (2015)

This psychological horror movie utilizes some of the visual and cinematic elements you’d expect to see in a surreal noir foreign film, but it steps far outside of that confining metaphorical box. It features the talented Lauren Ashley Carter along with a supporting cast that includes Larry Fessenden and Sean Young. Here’s the synopsis:

“A lonely young woman moves into an old, mysterious Manhattan mansion. She soon discovers the estate’s troubling past – stories which slowly transform into a backdrop for her twisted and violent descent into madness.”

With a 5.5 rating on IMDb, a case could be made that this is one of the best movies on Shudder period. After all, we know IMDb lowballs horror flicks for some reason. At only 78 minutes long, you’re missing out on a few episodes of The Office at the most. Here’s the trailer:

2. Flowers in the Attic (1987)

Wes Craven was scheduled to direct the film rendition of the V.C. Andrews book, Flowers in the Attic. Why haven’t you heard more about this? Probably because the producers were completely disturbed by the screenplay draft he submitted. The film got major negative reviews at the time, but modern audiences have been a bit less severe in their assessment.

Make no mistake: this writer is of the belief that the film would’ve been lightyears better had Craven gotten his bladed-finger-gloved mitts on it. Regardless, it’s still worth a watch. You’re either going to love it or hate it – there is no in-between. While many other films are more deserving of the best movie on Shudder title, this one falls squarely in the “so bad it’s good” category.

Here’s your trailer:

3. Spring (2014)

If you haven’t stumbled across Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead just yet, you’re in for one heck of a surprise. The two worked absolute magic and injected an infrequent fusion of originality into horror with their related films Resolution and The Endless. Seriously, go find those movies somewhere and watch them if you haven’t already. In that order!

If you’re a Shudder subscriber, though, you don’t have to go off on an expedition just yet. Spring is unrelated to the two aforementioned films, but it stands on its own with ease. This is one of the best movies on Shudder you probably haven’t seen for a variety of reasons, but when it comes down to brass tacks, it’s all thanks to Benson and Moorhead. Here’s the synopsis:

“An aimless young man (Lou Taylor Pucci) takes an impromptu trip to Italy and becomes involved with an alluring genetics student (Nadia Hilker) who harbors a transformative secret.”

It’s a twisted love story that showcases just a little of what Benson and Moorhead are all about. Trust me, you’re going to thank me once you get a taste of this duo. In the meantime, here’s the film’s trailer:

4. The House by the Cemetery (1981)

Going back another few decades, The House by the Cemetery is an Italian horror film that had the great Lucio Fulci at its helm. It tells the story of a New England house hounded by murders and the gruesome secret in the basement that keeps the horror moving forward.

This is another flick that received not-so-great reviews upon its release. Unlike Flowers in the Attic, though, the reviews haven’t gotten much better. There is some positive retrospective reception, but the infrequent praise typically falls into two categories: 1) so bad it’s good and 2) haunting atmosphere.

To be completely honest, though, the bad reviews are probably because it’s a Giallo film. This one was so bad that it had to be released unrated just to not garner the dreaded “X” label, and we know critics are just inept when it comes to reviewing these flicks. Check out the trailer below:

5. Blue My Mind (2017)

Bringing us back closer to the present is Blue My Mind. It’s a body horror film – just like Spring – and if you haven’t seen it, it’s definitely one of the best movies on Shudder you’ve missed. It’s got a 6.1 rating on IMDb – which is typically stellar for a horror movie – and the healthy dose of body grossness will keep you squirming throughout.

Here’s the synopsis:

“Mia, a 15-year-old, is facing an overwhelming transformation. Her body is changing radically, and despite desperate attempts to halt the process, she is soon forced to accept that nature is far more powerful than her.”

Puberty is hard on all of us, but poor Mia definitely drew the short straw. Check out the trailer and then enjoy this awesome flick:

What Best Movies on Shudder Did We Miss?

Whether they’re the best of the best or the best of the worst, these films demand at least one viewing. If you’re able to break away from the Shudder exclusives and new releases for a moment, you might get a kick out of these flicks or even discover a new favorite.

Still trying to find the best movies on Shudder that you may have missed? Feel free to head over to the Facebook group House of Shudder. And if you already have a few films in mind that we missed, though, tell us about them in the comments!

Curt has been an avid horror fan since sneaking the VHS of "Child's Play" out of his parents' room at the age of 8. Now he gets his jollies from found footage, B horror flicks, and films that couldn't pull off a theatrical release.