Fantastic Fest: The Greasy Strangler

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“The Greasy Strangler” is one depraved, weird mutha! The humor is reminiscent of John Waters early stuff with a bit of ‘Tim And Eric’ humor peppered in for good measure. That isn’t saying that it doesn’t pave its own way during the journey, because it totally does and leaves a greasy trail along the way.

“The Greasy Strangler” tells the story of a father and son duo, that have lived together way longer than anything you would call healthy. Their day job consists of giving walking disco tours to a motley crew of tourists. Their downtime is spent picking on each other while son, Big Brayden (Sky Elobar) prepares extra greasy meals for his father, Big Ronnie (Michael St. Michaels).

When these two meet Janet (Elizabeth De Razzo) it erupts into a battle to see who can win the heart of the focus of their affection. Oh, did I mention there is someone going around the city strangling people? Yea, a greasy monster is roaming the streets murdering whoever gets in its way.

Sounds crazy as fuck right? Well, this simple synopsis is nothing compared to the strange, hilarious and gory ride that this movie offers.

The humor hinges on uncomfortable takes that stick with the same joke for long periods of time. You know those kinds of jokes that go on too long and then go on so long that they become funny again? The Greasy Strangler is full of em.

Director, Jim Hosking had a segment in ‘ABC’s of Death 2’ that highlighted his signature style. Hosking takes an already strange premise and creates something uniquely, funny and disturbing. His film is equal parts greasy gross outs and entirely insane character developments.

“The Greasy Strangler” is one

depraved, weird mutha!”

Horror works well here. Even when faces aren’t being caved in, or someones eyes aren’t being popped out of their skull, the film offers visions of a naked man covered in grease being washed and dried in a carwash and a ton of other sights that you will be unable to un-see. The tone of the film dances between a dream state and a warped nightmare.

Andrew Hung’s score matches every bit of what is on screen. The synth-driven, cartoonish score wistfully plays out like something you would imagine hearing on a playground for the demonically possessed, right between the monkey bars and the swings.

This is also a film that is chock full of quotes. I can’t remember the last time a film had me quoting so many lines (for better or worse). Be prepared to use “Bullshit Artist” and “Hootie Tootie Disco Cutie” in everyday conversation for a while after watching.

When all is said and done, I can’t believe it exists. It’s absolutely insane. For that reason, I have a big greasy spot in my heart for this one. It was a perfect addition to Fantastic Fest and gives me very high hopes for Hosking’s next film. Prepare to get greasy!

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