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Headless announced that it will premiere at Culture Shock in Indianapolis at the end of next month. A post on the film’s Facebook page says:

HEADS ARE GOING TO ROLL when “Headless” makes its World Premiere at Culture Shock, sponsored by Days of the Dead, in Indianapolis on Saturday, February 28th, with an encore screening at the historic Buskirk-Chumley Theatre in Bloomington, Indiana, on Sunday, March 1st. Cast & Crew will be in attendance at both events — stay tuned for ticketing info!

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Last year saw the release of Scott Schirmer’s micro-budget coming-of-age horror film Found, which I had at number 2 on my Best of 2014 list. It’s one of those films that’s able to transcend its budgetary limitations with a great story and some pretty nasty gore effects.

Most of those gore effects came from the movie-within-a-movie called Headless, which has been turned into an actual feature-length movie for us real-life people to watch.

Headless was born in the mind of Todd Rigney, who wrote Found, the novel, which was turned into the film, which he co-wrote with Schirmer. In the story, Headless was a horror movie the main character’s brother had, which he used as influence for his own murders. It was the scenes from Headless that Schirmer’s film showed that got Found banned in real-life Australia.

Headless

headless premiere date

Naturally, fans of the movie thought it would be awesome if Headless, a sleazy 70s gorefest, were turned into an actual movie. Schirmer, from what I gather, never had any intentions of doing that until people kept asking about it after screenings, so he rounded up his posse and set out to make it, funding it through Kickstarter. He would co-produce, and hand over the director’s seat to Arthur Cullipher, who was responsible for the gore effects in Found. Shane Beasley, who played the killer in the original version of Headless, would reprise his role for the feature.

Headless

Rigney decided to pass on writing this one, so they tapped friend Nathan Erdel, who had worked with Friday the 13th scribe Victor Miller (Miller being involved in an on-screen capacity) on a short called Unwelcome. Erdel described the tone of Headless to us as in the vein of The Last House on Dead End Street and The Headless Eyes (both of which are pretty nuts).

We don’t know when the film will get a release, but it now exists for someone to make it happen.

Check out our recent interviews with Headless director Arthur Cullipher and killer Shane Beasley here. We also spoke with producer Kara Erdel here.

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